The Iraqi Army and their popular committees – are rolling in the Al-Ramadi countryside amid the repeated failures by the Islamic State of Iraq and Al-Sham (ISIS) to repel the swarming pro-government soldiers.

On Tuesday morning, the Iraqi Army and their allies struck again in the western countryside of Al-Ramadi as they reportedly killed over 100 enemy combatants (most due to airstrikes) in the last 72 hours before they imposed full control over the 7 Kilo Area.

In addition to their success in western Al-Ramadi, the Iraqi Security Forces and their allies have advanced in the southern sector of the city after a failed attempt by ISIS to counter the gains made by the pro-government forces near the Al-‘Anbar University.

Frustrated by their lack of progress in central Iraq, ISIS launched two large-scale offensives inside the Salahiddeen Governorate, targeting the Iraqi Army’s frontline defenses at the strategic cities of Samarra and Baiji.

ISIS struck the Baiji countryside first, attacking the Makhoul Mountains located just north of the city; however, their infiltration attempt proved unsuccessful, as the Iraqi Security Forces were able to repel the encroaching terrorists.

Meanwhile, at the predominately Shi’i city of Samarra, ISIS attempted to bypass the Badr Brigades’ frontline defenses, only to be stopped in their tracks before reaching its gates – several ISIS terrorists were reportedly killed as a result.

According to Iraqi activist – Haidar Sumeri (@IraqiSecurity) – the Iraqi Security Forces killed over 55 ISIS terrorists and destroyed 15 VBIEDs (Vehicle Borne Improvised Explosive Device) at the outskirts of Samarra yesterday.

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Following a series of failed offensives, ISIS terrorists reportedly resorted to using chlorine gas on the soldiers of Hashd Al-Sha’abi at the Jihadist stronghold of Karma; this chemical gas attack was reported by several Iraqi activists, including many journalists on the ground with the Iraqi Security Forces.

 

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Editor-in-ChiefSpecializing in Near Eastern Affairs and Economics.

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